Schur’s lemma states that if A is a simple R module, then \text{End}_R(A) is a division ring. A similar easy argument shows that:

Example 6. For simple R-modules A \ncong B we have \text{Hom}_R(A,B)=\{0\}.

Let’s generalize Schur’s lemma: let M be a finite direct product of simple R-submodules. So M \cong \bigoplus_{i=1}^k M_i^{n_i}, where each M_i is a simple R-module and M_i \ncong M_j for all i \neq j. Therefore, by Example 6 and Theorem 1, \text{End}_R(M) \cong \bigoplus_{i=1}^k \mathbb{M}_{n_i}(D_i), where D_i = \text{End}_R(M_i) is a division ring by Schur’s lemma. An important special case is when R is a semisimple ring. (Note that simple submodules of a ring are exactly minimal left ideals of that ring.)

Theorem 2. (Artin-Wedderburn) Let R be a semisimple ring. There exist a positive integer k and division rings D_i, \ 1 \leq i \leq , such that R \cong \bigoplus_{i=1}^k \mathbb{M}_{n_i}(D_i).

 Proof. Obvious, by Example 1 and the above discussion. \Box

Some applications of Theorem 2.

1. A commutative semisimple ring is a finite direct product of fields.

2. A reduced semisimple ring is a finite direct product of division rings.

3. A finite reduced ring is a finite direct product of finite fields.

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